Made in some ancient generation of stars.

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Jul. 26th 2008 in the deep end

© NASA

This is from a Discovery.com interview with Edgar Mitchell, an Apollo mission astronaut, who recently announced that people with knowledge about the alien ship crash in Rosewell, have shared their knowledge with him.

Which is the reason he’s interviewed.We love stories about aliens!

And here’s this gem from the interview, which is the reason I am sharing this with you.

“IK: Can you describe what changed you after you were in space? How did that happen?

EM: Well I’ve got a research foundation that has been working on that problem for 37 years.

I was coming back from the moon after completing a successful mission on the moon. My job was being responsible for the lunar spacecraft for the lunar surface activities. So on the way home, my successful job had been mostly completed and we were just coming home. We still had experiments and work to do, but the big stuff was done.

We were orientated such and rotating in order to keep the thermal balance of the spacecraft so that every two minutes you could see the Earth, the moon, the sun and a 360-degree panorama of the heavens came through the window every two minutes. That’s powerful stuff, particularly since it’s space. Without the atmosphere to block, the stars don’t twinkle, and there’s 10 times as many as you could possibly see on Earth because of the lack of interference and it’s much closer to what you could see through the Hubble Telescope these days, with those pictures and I hope you’ve looked at some of those: it’s overwhelming — and I realized as that happened, because I do have a PhD from MIT and I studied astronomy at Harvard and MIT and knew that molecules of matter in my body and in the spacecraft and in my partners’ bodies were made in some ancient generation of stars. That’s where matter is created.

Suddenly I realized that the molecules in my body were created in an ancient generation of stars and suddenly that became personal and visceral, not intellectual and I had never had this experience. It was accompanied by bliss, an ecstasy I had never experienced.

Later — and I’m making this long story short — with some discovery and some help from scientists at Rice University in Houston, I discovered in ancient transcripts that this type of experience — a transformational, transcendental experience where you see things as you perceive them but experience them viscerally and emotionally as one, as a part of it — is called samadhi. In doing more research, I found that it has taken place in every culture on Earth. The political and cultural expression of that turns out to be religion.

The experience is the same — a heady, overwhelming experience. But when it gets politicized, put into the culture, those things get lost on the people who had the experience and it becomes something else. So that’s what it was: a deep, deep cultural experience that is in the culture of our civilization in hundreds of places.”

Click here to read the full interview.

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